Archives for urban farm

Hydroponics – What is it?

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture, the method of growing plants without soil, using mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent. The nutrients in hydroponics can come from an array of different sources; including byproduct from fish waste, duck manure, or normal nutrients. - wikipediaA Brief history of HydroponicsAncient examples of humans adopting technique of hydrocultureHanging Gardens of Babylon created in  3rd Century BC was the first of the seven ‘wonders’ of the world that used up 8,200 gallons of water a day. There are trees and plants in small man-created fields constructed on top of roofed colonnades which gave an impression of plants suspending in mid-air.An illustration of the gardens by the 16th century Dutch artist Martin HeemskerckAztecs and Chinese developed a similar system of floating gardens. In Aztec, their engineers created “floating” gardens using rafts anchored to the bottom of the lake, or to a strong tree. On these rafts, they piled dirt and muds to plant seeds to grow chilli peppers, corn, tomatoes, beans, and squash. These raft garden became extensive gardens reaching up to 22,000 acres across the surface of the lake. Marco Polo discovered similar floating gardens during his exploration of China in 13th centuries. A
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Indoor Urban Farming. Is it worth the efforts?

Do you know anyone around you that are doing Urban farming today in their home? Have you ever wonder what are these urban farmers farming and why are they doing it? We’ll explore the “why” in another article but for now, let’s try to understand what we mean by Indoor Urban Farming. In order to do that, we need to explore 4 important concepts that enable us to be successful in Indoor Urban Farming. 1) What is an Urban Farming Movement? Urban Farming is when people are able to create food on unused land and space regardless it is a private or public housing estates. Urban Farms has also been created successfully in eateries, malls, schools, and offices. Many developing and developed countries worldwide are adopting urban farming in their city master plan mainly due to food security. Many non-government agencies are promoting the movement to grow your own food in suburban and urban cities because it provides fresh food, generates employment, recycles urban wastes, creates greenbelts, and strengthens cities’ resilience to climate change. 2) What is Indoor Farming? Indoor farming moves the creation of food from outdoor setup to an indoor environment. In Singapore, AVA is providing financial support to the farmer who is keen
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Categories: Information.